One Big Thing Men Can Learn From Women

It’s Simple Though, Really

Photo by Nechirwan Kavian on Unsplash

Take interest, that’s it.

You may exit this article. Or maybe not.

Here’s the thing. It’s beginning to dawn on me that it really is more common for women to think about others. To have others in mind, and to do this more often. To feel more responsible for others, and especially how others feel.

It’s not that men don’t do the above. If men do do the above, it typically tends to be at a lesser rate, done less willingly (perhaps questioning themselves what in the world they’re doing), or after doing the above, men may feel very entitled to some kind of reward or acknowledgment.

Maybe because at some level most men believe it’s not their job to think about others’ emotional wellbeing. In other words, it doesn’t occur to most men, perhaps, that there even is such a thing and that they themselves can be a part of implementing it— even though they may already be receiving it from their friends, girlfriend, mother, wife, female colleague

Don’t get me wrong, there are guys who are good listeners. Though it’s not just about listening. It’s about being present (holding space) and literally finding out what’s going on in someone’s life, how they’re dealing with those things, and where they can come in to be of service— and responding with a sense of genuine concern and care. This is how we build an empathetic world where people thrive as a result of humans caring about, empowering, and truly seeing each other.

And actually, not a lot of women are like this either. So forget what I said about the one big thing men can learn from women. Maybe it’s one big thing some can learn from others (a much fairer and accurate title).

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ISJ

ISJ

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All things life, spirituality, healing, psychotherapy, trauma-related, & mindfulness. Occasionally food & poetry.